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#1 dlibby01

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 08:03 PM

7. A respiration rate would be considered within normal limits for an adult at____ per minute, for a child at ____ per minute, and for an infant at____ per minute.

Your Answer: 20 - 40 - 60
Incorrect

Correct Answer is: 15 - 25 - 35

Other answers:
22 - 32 - 42
10 - 20 - 40

Rationale: Normal adult respiratory rates are from 12-20, children are 18-30 and infants are 30-60.


According to the AAOS ninth addition page# 150 normal ranges for respirations are Adult 12-20 / children 15-30 / infants 25-50
According to the EMS field guide 6th addition-informed.Infants Res are 22-30 at one year /neonatal before a yr are 40-60 resp?
1.So where do you guys get 30-60 for infants?

Regaurdless what you guys say. IF i am instructed by a teacher and its not the national standard. All i care about is where does National registry pull there info from? I dont want anything else except the BIBLE of national registry.



#2 dlibby01

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 08:35 PM

QUOTE (dlibby01 @ Feb 3 2010, 09:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
7. A respiration rate would be considered within normal limits for an adult at____ per minute, for a child at ____ per minute, and for an infant at____ per minute.

Your Answer: 20 - 40 - 60
Incorrect

Correct Answer is: 15 - 25 - 35

Other answers:
22 - 32 - 42
10 - 20 - 40

Rationale: Normal adult respiratory rates are from 12-20, children are 18-30 and infants are 30-60.


According to the AAOS ninth addition page# 150 normal ranges for respirations are Adult 12-20 / children 15-30 / infants 25-50
According to the EMS field guide 6th addition-informed.Infants Res are 22-30 at one year /neonatal before a yr are 40-60 resp?
1.So where do you guys get 30-60 for infants?

Regaurdless what you guys say. IF i am instructed by a teacher and its not the national standard. All i care about is where does National registry pull there info from? I dont want anything else except the BIBLE of national registry.



Question 2

How do you perform 2 rescue breaths in less than 1sec with a bvm. Is that possible?


8. You and your partner Ashley arrive at a house where dispatch reports a 911 call was made. Nobody was on the phone to report any emergency, and attempts at calling back have resulted in a busy signal. A frantic woman exits the house screaming about her daughter not breathing. You enter the home to find a 9 year old girl lying supine on the kitchen floor very cyanotic.After 2 rescue breaths, each given over a period of _______________, [/color]you begin ventilations with a BVM at a rate of ______________________ and a tidal volume of __________________________.



Correct Answer is: 1 second / 12-20 breaths per minute / enough air to cause adequate chest rise



Rationale: New AHA guidelines have rescue breaths performed over 1 second. Proper ventilation rates for children are now 12-20 breaths per minute. Tidal volume is no longer referred to in ml. The volume of each breath should be "just enough to cause adequate chest rise."



#3 ScottR

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 10:56 PM

QUOTE (dlibby01 @ Feb 3 2010, 09:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Question 2

How do you perform 2 rescue breaths in less than 1sec with a bvm. Is that possible?


8. You and your partner Ashley arrive at a house where dispatch reports a 911 call was made. Nobody was on the phone to report any emergency, and attempts at calling back have resulted in a busy signal. A frantic woman exits the house screaming about her daughter not breathing. You enter the home to find a 9 year old girl lying supine on the kitchen floor very cyanotic.After 2 rescue breaths, each given over a period of _______________, [/color]you begin ventilations with a BVM at a rate of ______________________ and a tidal volume of __________________________.



Correct Answer is: 1 second / 12-20 breaths per minute / enough air to cause adequate chest rise



Rationale: New AHA guidelines have rescue breaths performed over 1 second. Proper ventilation rates for children are now 12-20 breaths per minute. Tidal volume is no longer referred to in ml. The volume of each breath should be "just enough to cause adequate chest rise."



If you have an issue with a question, we ask that you address that in our help desk. That allows our technicians to promptly reply and correct any problems that arise with a question or other issue.
Now, since you have asked these questions here, let me answer.
1. Respiratory rates are really only suggested guidelines, and every EMS textbook has some variance. The NREMT is probably not going to use some borderline numbers to trick you, but we put questions like this in here to make you really look at what are the standard normal ranges. This is a study tool. We try to be a little harder, if possible, than the NREMT. I have compiled a list from multiple sources of 'acceptable' respiratory rate ranges;

Newborns: Average 44 breaths per minute (Some texts range 40-60, with 50 being considered too fast by others)
Infants: 2040 breaths per minute
Preschool children: 2030 breaths per minute
Older children: 1625 breaths per minute
Adults: 1220 breaths per minute
Adults during strenuous exercise 3545 breaths per minute

2. The question never asked you to do 2 rescue breaths in 1 second. CAREFULLY read the question before making an answer. It says "After 2 rescue breaths, EACH given over a period of 1 second...." Each breath is given over 1 second, not 2 breaths given over 1 second.

I hope this helps answer your questions.



EMT-National-Training.com Admin Staff



#4 dmaxwell16

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 09:22 PM

Don't worry about how accurate the numbers are. When it comes to the NREMT test they are so out of normal ranges that it doesnt make a difference. I took the NREMT test Tuesday and it cut me off at 71. This site is the best by far in order to do well on the test. This site is much easier than the NREMT test. They really try to trick you. On the NREMT test know your hypothermia, how to do chest compressions on an infant, and what do when a patient is choking!!! You will not do better on your own or from any other site. I took 100 questions a day for a month and also took the simulated test once a week and you will see your self progress very rapidly. I also made my own flash cards from the answers that I got wrong. that help out allot. Plus you will not get better support any where. Any question you have they respond so fast. I know I will come back when I go after my Paramedic. This time I will get the six month deal. Great site and thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!
P.S.
One thing that would kind of be nice is if within each section of testing areas (trauma, medical, ob ped,....) that you could say what kind of questions you could be asked. for example......... I had a hard time with GCS questions and I always had to wait and hope to get more of those questions. Or the other one for me was any questions in the ob,peds and special patients. I would have liked to get more of one or the other. I hope you understand what I am getting at. I felt like I knew some sections very well and others I didn't but I still had to go through allot of questions that I knew just to get to ones that where more difficult. That is my two cents. Thanks!!!!
PSS
Sorry one more thing. I did see some questions that didn't seem to be in an EMT-B job scope. One was what kind of intubation blade to use. There where a couple of those types of questions. I am in AZ and it may be different here. OK That's all I have.

#5 wolfwyndd

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 06:50 AM

QUOTE (ScottR @ Feb 3 2010, 10:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
1. Respiratory rates are really only suggested guidelines, and every EMS textbook has some variance. The NREMT is probably not going to use some borderline numbers to trick you, but we put questions like this in here to make you really look at what are the standard normal ranges. This is a study tool. We try to be a little harder, if possible, than the NREMT. I have compiled a list from multiple sources of 'acceptable' respiratory rate ranges;EMT-National-Training.com Admin Staff

I'm glad you answered this here.

I had a similar question turning my simulated exam and I thought the answer given was inaccurate. However, given you answer, I know understand. Thanks.